Stiletto Studios. Melina, the artist’s daughter sitting in his “Short Rest” multiple. 1989. Photograph by Maria Zastrow, 2010.
In 1983 the multimedia artist known as Stiletto reinterpreted the ubiquitous steel shopping cart as a lounge chair, creating, with just a few cuts and bends, a lightweight but symbolically laden new form called Consumer’s Rest. In 1989 he convinced a German manufacturer of shopping carts, Brüder Siegel, to produce a series of his work. When he became aware of their miniature shopping carts for children, he was compelled to create this child-sized chair, called Short Rest.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Stiletto Studios. Melina, the artist’s daughter sitting in his “Short Rest” multiple. 1989. Photograph by Maria Zastrow, 2010.

In 1983 the multimedia artist known as Stiletto reinterpreted the ubiquitous steel shopping cart as a lounge chair, creating, with just a few cuts and bends, a lightweight but symbolically laden new form called Consumer’s Rest. In 1989 he convinced a German manufacturer of shopping carts, Brüder Siegel, to produce a series of his work. When he became aware of their miniature shopping carts for children, he was compelled to create this child-sized chair, called Short Rest.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

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Get your daily dose of design from the MoMA exhibition Century of the Child: Growing by Design, 1900–2000. During each of the 100 days of the exhibition we will showcase an object featured in the show.

To find out more about Century of the Child visit MoMA.org/centuryofthechild.

Purchase the exhibition catalogue on MoMAStore.org or get the digital edition for the iPad on iTunes.

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