Figli della Lupa (Sons of the Wolf) tableware set. 1930s
Outside the classroom, Italian children could eat and drink from tableware designed to whet their appetites for future service in the colonies. In the mid-1930s the Richard Ginori porcelain factory manufactured children’s plates, cups, and saucers decorated with stereotypical colonial imagery—the ubiquitous palm tree, camel, pith helmet, rifle, tank, and huts flying the Italian flag—that celebrated Italy’s conquests in North and East Africa.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Figli della Lupa (Sons of the Wolf) tableware set. 1930s

Outside the classroom, Italian children could eat and drink from tableware designed to whet their appetites for future service in the colonies. In the mid-1930s the Richard Ginori porcelain factory manufactured children’s plates, cups, and saucers decorated with stereotypical colonial imagery—the ubiquitous palm tree, camel, pith helmet, rifle, tank, and huts flying the Italian flag—that celebrated Italy’s conquests in North and East Africa.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

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Get your daily dose of design from the MoMA exhibition Century of the Child: Growing by Design, 1900–2000. During each of the 100 days of the exhibition we will showcase an object featured in the show.

To find out more about Century of the Child visit MoMA.org/centuryofthechild.

Purchase the exhibition catalogue on MoMAStore.org or get the digital edition for the iPad on iTunes.

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