Posts tagged "clothing"
Child’s kimono with the manga character Norakuro the dog. 1930
The curious assemblage of visual references in the patterns of this boys’ kimono, a classic item of Japanese ceremonial clothing, reflects the tensions created by the speed of the country’s modernization and the military aspirations of the Meiji rulers. On this kimono, the motifs include an armored car, a military plane, and Norakuro (a popular cartoon dog) walking with a boy scout over a background of Japanese flags and silhouetted battle scenes featuring cavalrymen, marching troops, and soldiers with their arms raised in a “Banzai!” gesture, all framed by the sprockets of a motion-picture film.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Child’s kimono with the manga character Norakuro the dog. 1930

The curious assemblage of visual references in the patterns of this boys’ kimono, a classic item of Japanese ceremonial clothing, reflects the tensions created by the speed of the country’s modernization and the military aspirations of the Meiji rulers. On this kimono, the motifs include an armored car, a military plane, and Norakuro (a popular cartoon dog) walking with a boy scout over a background of Japanese flags and silhouetted battle scenes featuring cavalrymen, marching troops, and soldiers with their arms raised in a “Banzai!” gesture, all framed by the sprockets of a motion-picture film.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Laura Kriesch. Child’s embroidered bodice. 1903
The radical socialism that informed the Gödöllő artists’ pronouncements on modern design was also reflected in their unconventional dress and lifestyle, which included vegetarianism, nude bathing, and sleeping outdoors. Artistic dress in Budapest, as in other progressive centers, was designed to allow for freedom of movement, liberating young bodies from the tyranny of tight-fitting, elaborately tailored clothes. This bodice was designed and made by Laura Kriesch for her daughter, who can be seen wearing it in the photograph displayed on the wall above.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Laura Kriesch. Child’s embroidered bodice. 1903

The radical socialism that informed the Gödöllő artists’ pronouncements on modern design was also reflected in their unconventional dress and lifestyle, which included vegetarianism, nude bathing, and sleeping outdoors. Artistic dress in Budapest, as in other progressive centers, was designed to allow for freedom of movement, liberating young bodies from the tyranny of tight-fitting, elaborately tailored clothes. This bodice was designed and made by Laura Kriesch for her daughter, who can be seen wearing it in the photograph displayed on the wall above.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Get your daily dose of design from the MoMA exhibition Century of the Child: Growing by Design, 1900–2000. During each of the 100 days of the exhibition we will showcase an object featured in the show.

To find out more about Century of the Child visit MoMA.org/centuryofthechild.

Purchase the exhibition catalogue on MoMAStore.org or get the digital edition for the iPad on iTunes.

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