Posts tagged "drawing"
Rudolf Steiner. In mir ist Gott – Ich bin in Gott (God is in me – I am in God). 1924
This drawing indicates how Steiner, one of the most influential educational theorists of the twentieth-century, would illustrate school lessons and public lectures with rapid chalk sketches on a blackboard or sheets of black paper. By means of such instantaneous mark-making, he communicated his sense of thought as living, creative energy, and of the individual as part of larger metaphysical harmonies. Steiner established his first school in 1919 for children of employees at the Waldorf- Astoria cigarette factory in Stuttgart. Within a decade Steiner schools had been established not only in Germany and his native Switzerland, butin Austria, Britain, Hungary, the Netherlands, Norway, and the United States, where the first one opened in New York, on East 79th Street.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Rudolf Steiner. In mir ist Gott – Ich bin in Gott (God is in me – I am in God). 1924

This drawing indicates how Steiner, one of the most influential educational theorists of the twentieth-century, would illustrate school lessons and public lectures with rapid chalk sketches on a blackboard or sheets of black paper. By means of such instantaneous mark-making, he communicated his sense of thought as living, creative energy, and of the individual as part of larger metaphysical harmonies. Steiner established his first school in 1919 for children of employees at the Waldorf- Astoria cigarette factory in Stuttgart. Within a decade Steiner schools had been established not only in Germany and his native Switzerland, butin Austria, Britain, Hungary, the Netherlands, Norway, and the United States, where the first one opened in New York, on East 79th Street.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Margarete (Grete) Lihotzky. Perspective view from the southeast (view of the rotunda), design for an extension of Ernst Egli’s school for girls, Ankara. 1938
Lihotzky, perhaps best known for the design of modernist kitchens in the 1920s, designed numerous facilities and furniture for children in the course of her itinerant architectural career. Forced to leave the Soviet Union in 1937 because of a Stalinist purge of foreign expats, she eventually found work at the Istanbul Académie des Beaux-Arts through her friend, architect Bruno Taut, designing schools for the Ministry of Education. Turkey was a young republic undergoing radical modernization, a process being given architectural form by predominantly German-Austrian modernists. In her design for a girls’ school in Ankara, the new capital, Lihotzky combined simple, geometric volumes and a rational layout with a reference to monuments of the former Turkish Ottoman empire in the form of a double-story glazed rotunda.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Margarete (Grete) Lihotzky. Perspective view from the southeast (view of the rotunda), design for an extension of Ernst Egli’s school for girls, Ankara. 1938

Lihotzky, perhaps best known for the design of modernist kitchens in the 1920s, designed numerous facilities and furniture for children in the course of her itinerant architectural career. Forced to leave the Soviet Union in 1937 because of a Stalinist purge of foreign expats, she eventually found work at the Istanbul Académie des Beaux-Arts through her friend, architect Bruno Taut, designing schools for the Ministry of Education. Turkey was a young republic undergoing radical modernization, a process being given architectural form by predominantly German-Austrian modernists. In her design for a girls’ school in Ankara, the new capital, Lihotzky combined simple, geometric volumes and a rational layout with a reference to monuments of the former Turkish Ottoman empire in the form of a double-story glazed rotunda.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Juliet Kepes. Preparatory drawing for playroom mural in Kepes House, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 1949
Artist-designers Juliet and György Kepes created a stimulating and whimsical playroom in their house in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The room was meant to develop both the muscles and the senses of their five-year-old daughter Julie. The Kepeses claimed, “The first years are a time of concentrated learning and development. They should also be a time of wonder and delight.” The Kepes playroom was celebrated in Life magazine with a photo-essay in 1949. Original and recreated elements of this environment are displayed in the exhibition for the first time, with the help of the Kepeses’ own grandsons, Janos and Nico Stone.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Juliet Kepes. Preparatory drawing for playroom mural in Kepes House, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 1949

Artist-designers Juliet and György Kepes created a stimulating and whimsical playroom in their house in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The room was meant to develop both the muscles and the senses of their five-year-old daughter Julie. The Kepeses claimed, “The first years are a time of concentrated learning and development. They should also be a time of wonder and delight.” The Kepes playroom was celebrated in Life magazine with a photo-essay in 1949. Original and recreated elements of this environment are displayed in the exhibition for the first time, with the help of the Kepeses’ own grandsons, Janos and Nico Stone.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Aldo van Eyck. Drawing of sandpits, somersault frames, climbing frames, play tables, and climbing mountains. 1960
Van Eyck, like his friends Peter and Alison Smithson, was fascinated by the relationship between the child and the postwar city. He joined the Department of City Development at Amsterdam Public Works in 1947, and in the decades that followed he designed more than seven hundred playgrounds for the city. These spaces, often created from derelict lots, incorporated sandpits, metal climbing frames, stepping stones, and small concrete divots to collect rainwater in abstract compositions. Van Eyck, who considered physical recreation an important part of children’s development, defined areas for free-form activity without being closed off from the surrounding community.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Aldo van Eyck. Drawing of sandpits, somersault frames, climbing frames, play tables, and climbing mountains. 1960

Van Eyck, like his friends Peter and Alison Smithson, was fascinated by the relationship between the child and the postwar city. He joined the Department of City Development at Amsterdam Public Works in 1947, and in the decades that followed he designed more than seven hundred playgrounds for the city. These spaces, often created from derelict lots, incorporated sandpits, metal climbing frames, stepping stones, and small concrete divots to collect rainwater in abstract compositions. Van Eyck, who considered physical recreation an important part of children’s development, defined areas for free-form activity without being closed off from the surrounding community.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Get your daily dose of design from the MoMA exhibition Century of the Child: Growing by Design, 1900–2000. During each of the 100 days of the exhibition we will showcase an object featured in the show.

To find out more about Century of the Child visit MoMA.org/centuryofthechild.

Purchase the exhibition catalogue on MoMAStore.org or get the digital edition for the iPad on iTunes.

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