Posts tagged "furniture"
Alma Siedhoff-Buscher. Haus am Horn nursery furniture. 1923-24
Siedhoff-Buscher designed this furniture for the children’s room in the experimental Haus am Horn, part of the first Bauhaus exhibition of 1923. Widely regarded as the first true manifestation of the Bauhaus’s modernist principles in furniture construction and domestic design, Siedhoff-Buscher’s furniture exemplifies the opportunity to combine elemental, multipurpose forms with the potential for mass production. It also reflected her ambitious conception of design for children and belief in the potential of this area to effect change in society at large in addition to the individual child or family.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Alma Siedhoff-Buscher. Haus am Horn nursery furniture. 1923-24

Siedhoff-Buscher designed this furniture for the children’s room in the experimental Haus am Horn, part of the first Bauhaus exhibition of 1923. Widely regarded as the first true manifestation of the Bauhaus’s modernist principles in furniture construction and domestic design, Siedhoff-Buscher’s furniture exemplifies the opportunity to combine elemental, multipurpose forms with the potential for mass production. It also reflected her ambitious conception of design for children and belief in the potential of this area to effect change in society at large in addition to the individual child or family.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Giacomo Balla. Child’s wardrobe. 1918
Childlike figures composed of geometric forms flank the sides of this wardrobe. The piece was from a series of experimental interiors and toys for children created by Balla at the height of his involvement with Italian Futurism, an early-twentieth-century movement that emphasized concepts such as speed and industry, it also followed the birth of his second daughter, Elica (“propellor” in Italian), in 1914. Balla viewed design for children as an important part of the Futurist mission to reconstruct society, seeing their youthful energy was a natural match for expressions of the frenetic tempo of modern life.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Giacomo Balla. Child’s wardrobe. 1918

Childlike figures composed of geometric forms flank the sides of this wardrobe. The piece was from a series of experimental interiors and toys for children created by Balla at the height of his involvement with Italian Futurism, an early-twentieth-century movement that emphasized concepts such as speed and industry, it also followed the birth of his second daughter, Elica (“propellor” in Italian), in 1914. Balla viewed design for children as an important part of the Futurist mission to reconstruct society, seeing their youthful energy was a natural match for expressions of the frenetic tempo of modern life.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Ken Isaacs and Carole Isaacs. Josh Henry Living Structure. 1974
Ken Isaacs is an American designer who directed the design department at Cranbrook Academy of Art in the late 1950s and appeared on the cover of Life in September 1962 as a leader of the “Take-Over Generation.” Several examples of his and his wife Carole’s living structures — hybrids of furniture and architecture — were inspired by and intended for their son Joshua Henry, whose arrival both rocked and reinforced the couple’s simplified lifestyle. The Josh Henry Living Structure was a matrix made up of two thirty-six-inch cubes — one for activity, with a table and sliding bench, and the other for “relaxation and renewal,” with a sleeping surface that could be adjusted to six different heights, a chalkboard face, and a porthole hatch. The entire system could grow with Joshua, include a playmate or overnight guest, and even host his parents for dinner.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Ken Isaacs and Carole Isaacs. Josh Henry Living Structure. 1974

Ken Isaacs is an American designer who directed the design department at Cranbrook Academy of Art in the late 1950s and appeared on the cover of Life in September 1962 as a leader of the “Take-Over Generation.” Several examples of his and his wife Carole’s living structures — hybrids of furniture and architecture — were inspired by and intended for their son Joshua Henry, whose arrival both rocked and reinforced the couple’s simplified lifestyle. The Josh Henry Living Structure was a matrix made up of two thirty-six-inch cubes — one for activity, with a table and sliding bench, and the other for “relaxation and renewal,” with a sleeping surface that could be adjusted to six different heights, a chalkboard face, and a porthole hatch. The entire system could grow with Joshua, include a playmate or overnight guest, and even host his parents for dinner.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Get your daily dose of design from the MoMA exhibition Century of the Child: Growing by Design, 1900–2000. During each of the 100 days of the exhibition we will showcase an object featured in the show.

To find out more about Century of the Child visit MoMA.org/centuryofthechild.

Purchase the exhibition catalogue on MoMAStore.org or get the digital edition for the iPad on iTunes.

view archive