Posts tagged "museum"
Renate Müller. Modular indoor play area. 1985
Using a limited material vocabulary of jute, leather, and wood, Müller creates high-quality therapeutic toys and environments for active play, in handmade designs that are simple, combining robust forms (ideal for strength, balance, and motor exercises) with refined tactile qualities, bright colors, and straps or handles to encourage physical engagement. She started training in toy design in 1964 and soon launched a career in design for children with special needs, establishing her own studio in 1978. Her series of burlap beasts, which she promoted as “coarse but cute,” became popular in kindergartens and hospitals throughout the region. In her unique modular indoor playground, stick-puppet characters can be used to secure loose cushions into endless arrangements of playful structures.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Renate Müller. Modular indoor play area. 1985

Using a limited material vocabulary of jute, leather, and wood, Müller creates high-quality therapeutic toys and environments for active play, in handmade designs that are simple, combining robust forms (ideal for strength, balance, and motor exercises) with refined tactile qualities, bright colors, and straps or handles to encourage physical engagement. She started training in toy design in 1964 and soon launched a career in design for children with special needs, establishing her own studio in 1978. Her series of burlap beasts, which she promoted as “coarse but cute,” became popular in kindergartens and hospitals throughout the region. In her unique modular indoor playground, stick-puppet characters can be used to secure loose cushions into endless arrangements of playful structures.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Stiletto Studios. Melina, the artist’s daughter sitting in his “Short Rest” multiple. 1989. Photograph by Maria Zastrow, 2010.
In 1983 the multimedia artist known as Stiletto reinterpreted the ubiquitous steel shopping cart as a lounge chair, creating, with just a few cuts and bends, a lightweight but symbolically laden new form called Consumer’s Rest. In 1989 he convinced a German manufacturer of shopping carts, Brüder Siegel, to produce a series of his work. When he became aware of their miniature shopping carts for children, he was compelled to create this child-sized chair, called Short Rest.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Stiletto Studios. Melina, the artist’s daughter sitting in his “Short Rest” multiple. 1989. Photograph by Maria Zastrow, 2010.

In 1983 the multimedia artist known as Stiletto reinterpreted the ubiquitous steel shopping cart as a lounge chair, creating, with just a few cuts and bends, a lightweight but symbolically laden new form called Consumer’s Rest. In 1989 he convinced a German manufacturer of shopping carts, Brüder Siegel, to produce a series of his work. When he became aware of their miniature shopping carts for children, he was compelled to create this child-sized chair, called Short Rest.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Freehand drawing exercise. 1899
Tadd emphasized freehand blackboard drawing as combining physical and intellectual exercise in a way that reflected children’s natural tendency to express themselves through movement. He described this method as “a process that unfolds the capacities of children as unfold the leaves and flowers; a system that teaches the pupils that they are in the plan and part of life … illustrated in every natural thing.”
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Freehand drawing exercise. 1899

Tadd emphasized freehand blackboard drawing as combining physical and intellectual exercise in a way that reflected children’s natural tendency to express themselves through movement. He described this method as “a process that unfolds the capacities of children as unfold the leaves and flowers; a system that teaches the pupils that they are in the plan and part of life … illustrated in every natural thing.”

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Get your daily dose of design from the MoMA exhibition Century of the Child: Growing by Design, 1900–2000. During each of the 100 days of the exhibition we will showcase an object featured in the show.

To find out more about Century of the Child visit MoMA.org/centuryofthechild.

Purchase the exhibition catalogue on MoMAStore.org or get the digital edition for the iPad on iTunes.

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