Posts tagged "poster"
El Lissitzky. USSR. Die russische Ausstellung (USSR: The Russian exhibition), poster for exhibition at the Kunstgewerbemuseum, Zurich. 1929
In Lissitzky’s poster a boy and a girl are photographically fused into a single entity to embody the ideal of the international Soviet and its egalitarian, collective consciousness. Their open-necked shirts and the girl’s breeze-blown hair, silhouetted against an open sky, speak to the children’s healthy lifestyle and, by association, the vitality of the state. This poster prefigures many of the conventions that would harden into Socialist Realism, including the relentless optimism and the gigantism that elevates figures to a superhuman scale and power. But Lissitzky’s skilled use of photomontage and graphic design also make this an effective piece of propaganda, which was widely admired by avant-garde designers at the time.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

El Lissitzky. USSR. Die russische Ausstellung (USSR: The Russian exhibition), poster for exhibition at the Kunstgewerbemuseum, Zurich. 1929

In Lissitzky’s poster a boy and a girl are photographically fused into a single entity to embody the ideal of the international Soviet and its egalitarian, collective consciousness. Their open-necked shirts and the girl’s breeze-blown hair, silhouetted against an open sky, speak to the children’s healthy lifestyle and, by association, the vitality of the state. This poster prefigures many of the conventions that would harden into Socialist Realism, including the relentless optimism and the gigantism that elevates figures to a superhuman scale and power. But Lissitzky’s skilled use of photomontage and graphic design also make this an effective piece of propaganda, which was widely admired by avant-garde designers at the time.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Abram Games. Your Britain, Fight for It Now. 1942.
In this poster, the radiant entrance to the Finsbury Health Centre stands in front of a dark and blasted wartime landscape, where a sickly child plays in a puddle of muddy water amid total devastation. The center, radical in terms of its modernist architecture and medical philosophy, had delivered free medical care since 1935 in Finsbury, a working-class borough blighted by tuberculosis and slum housing. The political implications of the Finsbury center as the model for a national health scheme was not lost on the Conservative Prime Minister Winston Churchill, who ordered the entire issue of this poster to be destroyed on the grounds that it would damage national morale.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Abram Games. Your Britain, Fight for It Now. 1942.

In this poster, the radiant entrance to the Finsbury Health Centre stands in front of a dark and blasted wartime landscape, where a sickly child plays in a puddle of muddy water amid total devastation. The center, radical in terms of its modernist architecture and medical philosophy, had delivered free medical care since 1935 in Finsbury, a working-class borough blighted by tuberculosis and slum housing. The political implications of the Finsbury center as the model for a national health scheme was not lost on the Conservative Prime Minister Winston Churchill, who ordered the entire issue of this poster to be destroyed on the grounds that it would damage national morale.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

C. M. Settimana del Balilla 5–10 Dicembre XIV Genova (Balilla youth movement week, December 5–10, 1936 Genoa). 1935
The Italian dictator Benito Mussolini recognized the importance of preparing Italy’s boys for their future roles as soldiers and colonizers, and his regime took every opportunity of reminding the members of the Balilla—a youth group named for the boy who was said to have begun the eighteenth-century revolt against Italy’s Hapsburg occupiers—of their duty to become active participants in Italy’s expanding empire. This poster is dominated by a Balilla holding a rifle and wearing the organization’s uniform of blue neckerchief, black shirt, and khaki shorts; he gazes up toward a shining map of Italy’s new East African colonies.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

C. M. Settimana del Balilla 5–10 Dicembre XIV Genova (Balilla youth movement week, December 5–10, 1936 Genoa). 1935

The Italian dictator Benito Mussolini recognized the importance of preparing Italy’s boys for their future roles as soldiers and colonizers, and his regime took every opportunity of reminding the members of the Balilla—a youth group named for the boy who was said to have begun the eighteenth-century revolt against Italy’s Hapsburg occupiers—of their duty to become active participants in Italy’s expanding empire. This poster is dominated by a Balilla holding a rifle and wearing the organization’s uniform of blue neckerchief, black shirt, and khaki shorts; he gazes up toward a shining map of Italy’s new East African colonies.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Friedl Dicker. So sieht sie aus, mein Kind, diese Welt (This is how the world looks, my child). 1932-33
Dicker, who trained at the Bauhaus in Germany, designed this poster for the Viennese Communist Party in response to the rapidly deteriorating economic situation of 1932–33 and the rise of Fascism in Austria. The photomontage presents her view of the present and future positions of children in society, touching on themes of poverty, birth control, unemployment, hunger, slum dwelling, and Nazism. Her concern for children extended to their education; in 1930, with her then-partner Franz Singer, she designed a Montessori kindergarten that was widely admired as a showpiece of Vienna’s enlightened educational policy and a model of modernist design.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Friedl Dicker. So sieht sie aus, mein Kind, diese Welt (This is how the world looks, my child). 1932-33

Dicker, who trained at the Bauhaus in Germany, designed this poster for the Viennese Communist Party in response to the rapidly deteriorating economic situation of 1932–33 and the rise of Fascism in Austria. The photomontage presents her view of the present and future positions of children in society, touching on themes of poverty, birth control, unemployment, hunger, slum dwelling, and Nazism. Her concern for children extended to their education; in 1930, with her then-partner Franz Singer, she designed a Montessori kindergarten that was widely admired as a showpiece of Vienna’s enlightened educational policy and a model of modernist design.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

"A new division in playground planning," advertisement for Creative Playthings Inc. Playsculpture Division, September 1955.
In the early postwar period, “play sculpture”—abstract, often free-standing concrete structures designed by artists and architects alike—proved that modern design could make playgrounds beautiful while providing new forms for imaginative recreation; the movement generated photogenic results such as the colorful Ägget (The egg) by Danish artist Egon Møller-Nielsen. In this advertisement, Ägget is highlighted as a product of the Play Sculptures division of Creative Playthings, celebrated purveyor of “good toys” since 1949. The company was associated with MoMA as a partner in the museum’s national Play Sculpture competition of 1953, and eleven prize-winning designs were displayed at the Museum through the summer of 1954.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

"A new division in playground planning," advertisement for Creative Playthings Inc. Playsculpture Division, September 1955.

In the early postwar period, “play sculpture”—abstract, often free-standing concrete structures designed by artists and architects alike—proved that modern design could make playgrounds beautiful while providing new forms for imaginative recreation; the movement generated photogenic results such as the colorful Ägget (The egg) by Danish artist Egon Møller-Nielsen. In this advertisement, Ägget is highlighted as a product of the Play Sculptures division of Creative Playthings, celebrated purveyor of “good toys” since 1949. The company was associated with MoMA as a partner in the museum’s national Play Sculpture competition of 1953, and eleven prize-winning designs were displayed at the Museum through the summer of 1954.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Herbert Matter. One of Them Had Polio, Skilled Teamwork Brought Recovery. 1949-50
The fight against polio, a terrifying disease that before the development of a vaccine in 1955 crippled thousands of once active, healthy children, was the theme of a poster competition initiated by MoMA in 1949, cosponsored with the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. Twenty-three artists were briefed with medical information and asked to come up with designs and slogans to raise awareness of new treatments becoming available. Matter’s winning entry, with figures of a running girl and boy (his son Alex who had suffered from polio), epitomized a newfound sense of freedom that allowed the once afflicted child to be just like the other child.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Herbert Matter. One of Them Had Polio, Skilled Teamwork Brought Recovery. 1949-50

The fight against polio, a terrifying disease that before the development of a vaccine in 1955 crippled thousands of once active, healthy children, was the theme of a poster competition initiated by MoMA in 1949, cosponsored with the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. Twenty-three artists were briefed with medical information and asked to come up with designs and slogans to raise awareness of new treatments becoming available. Matter’s winning entry, with figures of a running girl and boy (his son Alex who had suffered from polio), epitomized a newfound sense of freedom that allowed the once afflicted child to be just like the other child.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Paul (Geert Paul Hendrikus ) Schuitema. Nutricia, le lait en poudre (Nutricia, powdered milk). 1927-28
The industrial manufacture of artificial proteins like Nutricia, a Dutch powdered-milk substitute, helped to extend the shelf life of perishable food in homes without refrigeration. Nutricia was one of a new generation of products used to battle malnutrition and high levels of infant mortality. Modern graphic design assisted in the promotion of such brands while also helping to allay consumer suspicions. Schuitema’s photomontage of smiling children and a mass society suggested both the widespread appeal and the modernity of the product.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Paul (Geert Paul Hendrikus ) Schuitema. Nutricia, le lait en poudre (Nutricia, powdered milk). 1927-28

The industrial manufacture of artificial proteins like Nutricia, a Dutch powdered-milk substitute, helped to extend the shelf life of perishable food in homes without refrigeration. Nutricia was one of a new generation of products used to battle malnutrition and high levels of infant mortality. Modern graphic design assisted in the promotion of such brands while also helping to allay consumer suspicions. Schuitema’s photomontage of smiling children and a mass society suggested both the widespread appeal and the modernity of the product.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Werner John. Kinder Verkehrs Garten (Children’s traffic garden), poster advertising a children’s traffic school. 1959
The graphic simplicity of John’s poster design succinctly references both the abstract forms of children’s construction toys and modern styles of road signage being introduced internationally. In the 1950s and ’60s, the proliferation of motorized vehicles was creating concern about children’s public safety and liberty. One response was to merge traffic and play in the form of children’s traffic schools. For play advocates, however, the lack of public space allocated to children and the overbearing presence of cars were indications of adults’ lack of respect for children’s freedom and basic human rights.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Werner John. Kinder Verkehrs Garten (Children’s traffic garden), poster advertising a children’s traffic school. 1959

The graphic simplicity of John’s poster design succinctly references both the abstract forms of children’s construction toys and modern styles of road signage being introduced internationally. In the 1950s and ’60s, the proliferation of motorized vehicles was creating concern about children’s public safety and liberty. One response was to merge traffic and play in the form of children’s traffic schools. For play advocates, however, the lack of public space allocated to children and the overbearing presence of cars were indications of adults’ lack of respect for children’s freedom and basic human rights.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Attributed to Augusto. ¿Que fais-tu pour empêcher cela? (What are you doing to prevent it?). 1937
During the Spanish Civil War, which ravaged the country from 1936 to 1939, women and children were often the principal victims of the indiscriminate bombing of cities by the Nationalists. Images of dead children and grief-stricken mothers featured prominently in Republican propaganda, such as in this poster, which incorporates a photograph by the Hungarian photojournalist Robert Capa. George Orwell, a British journalist and volunteer on the Republican side, observed that “the revolutionary posters were everywhere, flaming from the walls in clean reds and blues that made the few remaining advertisements look like daubs of mud.”
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Attributed to Augusto. ¿Que fais-tu pour empêcher cela? (What are you doing to prevent it?). 1937

During the Spanish Civil War, which ravaged the country from 1936 to 1939, women and children were often the principal victims of the indiscriminate bombing of cities by the Nationalists. Images of dead children and grief-stricken mothers featured prominently in Republican propaganda, such as in this poster, which incorporates a photograph by the Hungarian photojournalist Robert Capa. George Orwell, a British journalist and volunteer on the Republican side, observed that “the revolutionary posters were everywhere, flaming from the walls in clean reds and blues that made the few remaining advertisements look like daubs of mud.”

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Paul Rand. Poster for SOS Children’s Village. 1996
Rand’s depiction of a child balancing on a textual tightrope—playful but precarious—was designed to promote SOS Children’s Village, an international charity for orphaned and abandoned children. The poster, which incorporates an intriguing detail of Children’s Games (1560), by Pieter Bruegel the Elder, is thought to be Rand’s last work before his death.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Paul Rand. Poster for SOS Children’s Village. 1996

Rand’s depiction of a child balancing on a textual tightrope—playful but precarious—was designed to promote SOS Children’s Village, an international charity for orphaned and abandoned children. The poster, which incorporates an intriguing detail of Children’s Games (1560), by Pieter Bruegel the Elder, is thought to be Rand’s last work before his death.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Get your daily dose of design from the MoMA exhibition Century of the Child: Growing by Design, 1900–2000. During each of the 100 days of the exhibition we will showcase an object featured in the show.

To find out more about Century of the Child visit MoMA.org/centuryofthechild.

Purchase the exhibition catalogue on MoMAStore.org or get the digital edition for the iPad on iTunes.

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