Posts tagged "space"
Zdeněk Němeček. Sputnik play sculpture. 1959
The era of the space race was a time of mounting ambitions and anxieties for adults, but for children all over the world it was a time of great imaginative play, with new designed environments in which they could act out their own aerospace adventures. Junior astronauts and cosmonauts commanded scaled-down rockets and satellites, the most striking of which were abstract sculptural departures from the conventional forms. Němeček’s interpretation of Sputnik’s aluminum sphere as an elegant concrete play sculpture, encased in multicolored ceramic and featuring a climbing tube and slide, was originally installed in Stromovka Park, in Prague.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Zdeněk Němeček. Sputnik play sculpture. 1959

The era of the space race was a time of mounting ambitions and anxieties for adults, but for children all over the world it was a time of great imaginative play, with new designed environments in which they could act out their own aerospace adventures. Junior astronauts and cosmonauts commanded scaled-down rockets and satellites, the most striking of which were abstract sculptural departures from the conventional forms. Němeček’s interpretation of Sputnik’s aluminum sphere as an elegant concrete play sculpture, encased in multicolored ceramic and featuring a climbing tube and slide, was originally installed in Stromovka Park, in Prague.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Roger Limbrick. Space Station and Space Rocket cardboard toys. 1968
In 1968 the British company Polypops developed three flat-packed cardboard spacecraft toys designed by Limbrick: Lunartrack, Space Station, and Space Rocket. When constructed, the Space Rocket is just large enough to accommodate one child passenger; its exterior is coated in foil and its interior is intricately printed with dials and circuits.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Roger Limbrick. Space Station and Space Rocket cardboard toys. 1968

In 1968 the British company Polypops developed three flat-packed cardboard spacecraft toys designed by Limbrick: Lunartrack, Space Station, and Space Rocket. When constructed, the Space Rocket is just large enough to accommodate one child passenger; its exterior is coated in foil and its interior is intricately printed with dials and circuits.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Boys in a Glasgow back court show off their Christmas presents, which include astronaut suits and Space Hoppers. 1970
Outer space, a new frontier, was sufficiently vast and mysterious to allow designers and toy manufacturers near-complete freedom of imagination and creation. One rather enigmatic but popular product was Mettoy’s Space Hopper. These bright orange vinyl bouncing balls, two feet in diameter, with kangaroolike faces and handles that resembled horns, are said to have been inspired by children bouncing on fishing buoys in Norway.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Boys in a Glasgow back court show off their Christmas presents, which include astronaut suits and Space Hoppers. 1970

Outer space, a new frontier, was sufficiently vast and mysterious to allow designers and toy manufacturers near-complete freedom of imagination and creation. One rather enigmatic but popular product was Mettoy’s Space Hopper. These bright orange vinyl bouncing balls, two feet in diameter, with kangaroolike faces and handles that resembled horns, are said to have been inspired by children bouncing on fishing buoys in Norway.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Get your daily dose of design from the MoMA exhibition Century of the Child: Growing by Design, 1900–2000. During each of the 100 days of the exhibition we will showcase an object featured in the show.

To find out more about Century of the Child visit MoMA.org/centuryofthechild.

Purchase the exhibition catalogue on MoMAStore.org or get the digital edition for the iPad on iTunes.

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