Posts tagged "war"
Child’s kimono with the manga character Norakuro the dog. 1930
The curious assemblage of visual references in the patterns of this boys’ kimono, a classic item of Japanese ceremonial clothing, reflects the tensions created by the speed of the country’s modernization and the military aspirations of the Meiji rulers. On this kimono, the motifs include an armored car, a military plane, and Norakuro (a popular cartoon dog) walking with a boy scout over a background of Japanese flags and silhouetted battle scenes featuring cavalrymen, marching troops, and soldiers with their arms raised in a “Banzai!” gesture, all framed by the sprockets of a motion-picture film.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Child’s kimono with the manga character Norakuro the dog. 1930

The curious assemblage of visual references in the patterns of this boys’ kimono, a classic item of Japanese ceremonial clothing, reflects the tensions created by the speed of the country’s modernization and the military aspirations of the Meiji rulers. On this kimono, the motifs include an armored car, a military plane, and Norakuro (a popular cartoon dog) walking with a boy scout over a background of Japanese flags and silhouetted battle scenes featuring cavalrymen, marching troops, and soldiers with their arms raised in a “Banzai!” gesture, all framed by the sprockets of a motion-picture film.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

El Lissitzky. USSR. Die russische Ausstellung (USSR: The Russian exhibition), poster for exhibition at the Kunstgewerbemuseum, Zurich. 1929
In Lissitzky’s poster a boy and a girl are photographically fused into a single entity to embody the ideal of the international Soviet and its egalitarian, collective consciousness. Their open-necked shirts and the girl’s breeze-blown hair, silhouetted against an open sky, speak to the children’s healthy lifestyle and, by association, the vitality of the state. This poster prefigures many of the conventions that would harden into Socialist Realism, including the relentless optimism and the gigantism that elevates figures to a superhuman scale and power. But Lissitzky’s skilled use of photomontage and graphic design also make this an effective piece of propaganda, which was widely admired by avant-garde designers at the time.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

El Lissitzky. USSR. Die russische Ausstellung (USSR: The Russian exhibition), poster for exhibition at the Kunstgewerbemuseum, Zurich. 1929

In Lissitzky’s poster a boy and a girl are photographically fused into a single entity to embody the ideal of the international Soviet and its egalitarian, collective consciousness. Their open-necked shirts and the girl’s breeze-blown hair, silhouetted against an open sky, speak to the children’s healthy lifestyle and, by association, the vitality of the state. This poster prefigures many of the conventions that would harden into Socialist Realism, including the relentless optimism and the gigantism that elevates figures to a superhuman scale and power. But Lissitzky’s skilled use of photomontage and graphic design also make this an effective piece of propaganda, which was widely admired by avant-garde designers at the time.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Gioco delle 3 oche (Game of the 3 geese). 1944
Toy companies in both Axis and Allied countries produced board games, puzzles, and toys that made World War II seem fun. Italian children could play Gioco delle 3 oche, an allegorical game depicting the enemy as silly geese ready for slaughter.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Gioco delle 3 oche (Game of the 3 geese). 1944

Toy companies in both Axis and Allied countries produced board games, puzzles, and toys that made World War II seem fun. Italian children could play Gioco delle 3 oche, an allegorical game depicting the enemy as silly geese ready for slaughter.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

SAKAMPF board game. 1933
After 1933 all German children’s organizations were outlawed except for the officially sanctioned Hitler Youth, and the paramilitary overtones of German youth culture became more pronounced. These priorities were reinforced by Nazi-themed toys, books, and board games such as SAKAMPF, which prepared young boys for an active role in the armed forces and encouraged them to identify with the Nazi insignia and ideology.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

SAKAMPF board game. 1933

After 1933 all German children’s organizations were outlawed except for the officially sanctioned Hitler Youth, and the paramilitary overtones of German youth culture became more pronounced. These priorities were reinforced by Nazi-themed toys, books, and board games such as SAKAMPF, which prepared young boys for an active role in the armed forces and encouraged them to identify with the Nazi insignia and ideology.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

C. M. Settimana del Balilla 5–10 Dicembre XIV Genova (Balilla youth movement week, December 5–10, 1936 Genoa). 1935
The Italian dictator Benito Mussolini recognized the importance of preparing Italy’s boys for their future roles as soldiers and colonizers, and his regime took every opportunity of reminding the members of the Balilla—a youth group named for the boy who was said to have begun the eighteenth-century revolt against Italy’s Hapsburg occupiers—of their duty to become active participants in Italy’s expanding empire. This poster is dominated by a Balilla holding a rifle and wearing the organization’s uniform of blue neckerchief, black shirt, and khaki shorts; he gazes up toward a shining map of Italy’s new East African colonies.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

C. M. Settimana del Balilla 5–10 Dicembre XIV Genova (Balilla youth movement week, December 5–10, 1936 Genoa). 1935

The Italian dictator Benito Mussolini recognized the importance of preparing Italy’s boys for their future roles as soldiers and colonizers, and his regime took every opportunity of reminding the members of the Balilla—a youth group named for the boy who was said to have begun the eighteenth-century revolt against Italy’s Hapsburg occupiers—of their duty to become active participants in Italy’s expanding empire. This poster is dominated by a Balilla holding a rifle and wearing the organization’s uniform of blue neckerchief, black shirt, and khaki shorts; he gazes up toward a shining map of Italy’s new East African colonies.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Friedl Dicker. So sieht sie aus, mein Kind, diese Welt (This is how the world looks, my child). 1932-33
Dicker, who trained at the Bauhaus in Germany, designed this poster for the Viennese Communist Party in response to the rapidly deteriorating economic situation of 1932–33 and the rise of Fascism in Austria. The photomontage presents her view of the present and future positions of children in society, touching on themes of poverty, birth control, unemployment, hunger, slum dwelling, and Nazism. Her concern for children extended to their education; in 1930, with her then-partner Franz Singer, she designed a Montessori kindergarten that was widely admired as a showpiece of Vienna’s enlightened educational policy and a model of modernist design.
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Friedl Dicker. So sieht sie aus, mein Kind, diese Welt (This is how the world looks, my child). 1932-33

Dicker, who trained at the Bauhaus in Germany, designed this poster for the Viennese Communist Party in response to the rapidly deteriorating economic situation of 1932–33 and the rise of Fascism in Austria. The photomontage presents her view of the present and future positions of children in society, touching on themes of poverty, birth control, unemployment, hunger, slum dwelling, and Nazism. Her concern for children extended to their education; in 1930, with her then-partner Franz Singer, she designed a Montessori kindergarten that was widely admired as a showpiece of Vienna’s enlightened educational policy and a model of modernist design.

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Lorraine Schneider. War is Not Healthy for Children and Other Living Things. 1966
Schneider, an artist and mother of four, created this poster for a print show at Pratt Institute in New York, out of concern that her eldest son would be drafted. The rough composition, with its simple sunflower and childlike scrawl, became the logo for Another Mother for Peace, an organization led in the present day by Lorraine’s daughter Carol, and went on to become one of the most ubiquitous protest images of the Vietnam War era. “Man will learn to resolve his inevitable difference through nonmilitary alternatives,” Schneider said at a United Nations disarmament conference in 1972. “But it is up to us, the artists … to prepare the emotional soil for the last step out of the cave.”
Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Lorraine Schneider. War is Not Healthy for Children and Other Living Things. 1966

Schneider, an artist and mother of four, created this poster for a print show at Pratt Institute in New York, out of concern that her eldest son would be drafted. The rough composition, with its simple sunflower and childlike scrawl, became the logo for Another Mother for Peace, an organization led in the present day by Lorraine’s daughter Carol, and went on to become one of the most ubiquitous protest images of the Vietnam War era. “Man will learn to resolve his inevitable difference through nonmilitary alternatives,” Schneider said at a United Nations disarmament conference in 1972. “But it is up to us, the artists … to prepare the emotional soil for the last step out of the cave.”

Learn more at MoMA.org/centuryofthechild

Get your daily dose of design from the MoMA exhibition Century of the Child: Growing by Design, 1900–2000. During each of the 100 days of the exhibition we will showcase an object featured in the show.

To find out more about Century of the Child visit MoMA.org/centuryofthechild.

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